How to Design a Fitness Gym for Home?

How to Design a Fitness Gym for Home?

Designing Your Own Home Gym for Fitness and Health

fitness and health

Who says you need to go out and sign up for a gym membership to get fit? With the current array of fitness equipment specially designed for home gym use, there is really no excuse not to get up and get healthy. Besides, if you’re thinking about putting up a home gym, you probably are determined to follow a regular fitness regimen. But how do you start designing your fitness gym at home?

Here are a few tips on designing a home fitness gym to meet your special needs and goals:

Budget

More than anything, your budget is what will define the look, size and quality of your home fitness equipment. Shop around for something you like or the kind of gym equipment that will suit the fitness regimen you intend to follow. Don’t buy a stair stepper if a treadmill is all you need.

While you’re at it, shop for quality home gym equipment. Remember that where quality is concerned, price figures a lot in the equation. Most of the best home gym equipment are priced steeply because they offer top quality. Oftentimes, what you get is what you pay for, so make sure you don’t give in to impulse buying. Top quality gym equipment will last for years so don’t expect the same reliability with cheap gym sets.

Put your money where your need is. Don’t buy home fitness equipment that costs $2000 if a $200 set will do. With so many home gym equipment choices available, you’re sure to find one that will fit your fitness goals and budget perfectly.

Usage

Consider how many people in your home will be using your fitness equipment. If you’re the only one, then you have free rein in terms of size, style and features that fit your body type and fitness program. If there are other people in the household who will be using your home gym equipment, consider programming features and adequate size that can accommodate different users with different fitness goals.

Location

If you’re serious about getting fit, then you need to make room for your home gym equipment. Depending on the size of the fitness equipment you’re bringing in, make sure there’s enough room for you to move while doing your exercises. A spare room in the house, your family den, even your basement should have enough space. Just make sure it’s an area of the house that is conducive to exercise.

Be inspired

A blank wall may not be much of a motivation when you’re performing your fitness regimen. Design a room that makes you feel energized. Paint the walls if you can, change the wallpaper or simply hang out a big mirror so you can watch your progress.

Try to keep stuff away from the room that distracts you from your fitness routine. If TV makes you feel lazy, don’t put it in the same room. On the other hand, if it helps keep you moving while you’re being entertained, then integrate it into your home gym design.

Clone a gym

If you’ve been to a fitness gym before, you might have noticed certain elements and arrangements that you liked. If you find a certain design attractive or effective, you can take a few things from that and integrate it into your home gym. It could be as simple as gym equipment arrangement or design elements in the gym itself.

Take note of the placement of the gym equipment and see why it’s effective in terms of the continuance in a fitness regimen. Observe how spaces between equipment are used and how color inspires gym users to work harder. Making your home gym feel like a professional gym can do wonders in motivating you to exercise.

Designing your home gym

To maximize the space in your home, design a floor plan. This lets you budget your space and provide the best placement for your home gym equipment. Place the taller and bulkier gym equipment next to the walls and arrange smaller equipment around it or near the middle of the room.

When it comes to space allocation for your home gym, here are some approximate room space assignments you might need for different fitness equipment:

Stationary bicycle – 10 sq. ft.
Treadmill – 30 sq. ft.
Rowing machine – 20 to 25 sq. ft.
Ski machine – at least 20 sq. ft.
Stair climbers – at least 10 sq. ft.
Single-station gym equipment – at least 30 sq. ft.
Multi-station gym equipment – at least 50 sq. ft.

A home gym offers a lot of things that health clubs cannot – privacy, convenience and a comfortable place that has less distractions.

When designing a home gym for your fitness routine, always keep in mind your needs and goals.

If your home gym can meet these requirements, you’ll always look forward to an inspiring workout and live a healthier life.